Monday, March 22, 2010

Corned Beef & Cabbage


I thought another year would pass without a St. Patrick's Day Corned Beef & Cabbage post. But, this year, I made it twice!
We had some friends & family over for the holiday this year. It was such a success, that all 6 pounds of corned beef were devoured. Not a scrap of anything leftover. I had made some homemade Russian salad dressing in hopes of making some Reuben sandwiches with the leftovers {those posts are coming!}. So, I decided, why not make it again? This time I halved the recipe & we had a few leftovers...not much though!
The first time I attempted this meal was two years ago. I shopped the day before St. Patrick's Day & all that was left at the market was low sodium corned beef. Obviously, not as popular as the regular variety. I loved it! Corned Beef can be way too salty & the low sodium variety is still salty, but just not so overwhelming. I highly recommend it.
I love this recipe. It does take half the day...but, it couldn't be simpler.

Begin by putting 2-3 pound corned beef briskets in a large stockpot. Add 6 carrots {peeled & cut into large chunks}.

Peel 3 large onions & cut them in half. Remove the stringy part of the core, but leave some intact. This helps hold them together. Cut the halves into quarters.

Add them to the pot. Tie together a few sprigs of fresh parsley & thyme.

Add them to the pot, along with 2 teaspoons of dry mustard.

Add in enough cold water to cover the contents by a few inches.
Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer, cover the pot & cook for 2 hours.

Trim the outer leaves of the cabbage off. Cut into quarters & add to the pot. Cook for an additional 2 hours. Remove the corned beef from the pot & transfer to a cutting board. Remove any visible fat from the brisket & cut into thin slices against the grain.

Using a slotted spoon, remove the cabbage & carrots. Transfer the corned beef & vegetables to a serving platter & serve.

Corned Beef & Cabbage

Adapted from Irish Traditional Cooking, by Darina Allen
Serves 8

2- 3 pound corned beef briskets
6 large carrots, peeled & cut into large chunks
3 large onions, peeled & quartered
2 teaspoon dry mustard
a few sprigs each of fresh parsley & fresh thyme, tied together
4 small heads of cabbage

Put the corned beef brisket into a large stock pot. Add the carrots, onion, mustard & herb bundle. Cover with cold water & bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer, cover the pot & cook for 2 hours. Trim the outer leaves of the cabbage off. Cut into quarters & add to the pot. Cook for an additional 2 hours.
Remove the corned beef from the pot & transfer to a cutting board. Remove any visible fat from the brisket & cut into thin slices against the grain. Using a slotted spoon, remove the cabbage & carrots. Transfer the corned beef & vegetables to a serving platter & serve.
This meal is particularly great when served with some Guinness Mustard & Horseradish Cream as condiments.

Click here for the printable recipe.

4 comments:

qutins said...

yum! Can I come over? If i do cook corned beef, it will be just me, eating the whole thing!! Lol, but this recipe looks so easy and delicious.

Lisa said...

Sounds delicious! I'll end up halving it though (only two of us!) but it sounds delightful. Can't wait to enjoy it with a guiness!

Anonymous said...

Your photos are stunning. I have only one comment- you omitted the usual practice of skimming the scum that rises from the initial cooking of the corned beef. Probably you have a good reason for doing it the way you do, but many recipes include that step.

kate said...

Anonymous - Thank you for the kind comments regarding my photos :)
This is a recipe by Darina Allen, which I found on the website, Epicurious. She does not instruct to skim any of the foamy stuff off the water - which is why I did not do so here. To tell you the truth, I don't think it's really necessary, but you certainly could if you'd like to! I think it depends on the corned beef you use, how fast you boil the liquid and I'm sure other factors as well.
If the scum is abundant to the point where it would attach to the beef or cabbage and leave them unappetizing looking, I would skim it off. But in my experience, I don't find it to be an issue. Hope this helps!
- Katie

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